Guest Posts

Los Angeles, City of Water…

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From Janie Sheppard
Mendocino County

[If Los Angeles can hugely reduce its water consumption it’s worth a few minutes to consider the claims of Claude Lewenz that MendoVito could indeed further show us the way forward.  Surely if Los Angeles can reduce its water usage, a new community that doesn’t have to retrofit can reduce per capita water use hugely as well.  It’s at least worth considering.  I recommend reading the article in the New York Times via the link below.

“One sign of Los Angeles’s earnestness is its success in conservation: The city now consumes less water than it did in 1970, while its population has grown by more than a third, to 3.9 million people from 2.8 million. Two projects — a nine-acre water-treating wetland constructed in a former bus maintenance yard and a water management plan devised for a flood-prone district of 80,000 people — won awards this year from the Institute for Sustainable Infrastructure. The city itself won one of the first water sustainability awards given by the U.S. Water Alliance, in 2011.” -JS]

LOS ANGELES is the nation’s water archvillain, according to public perception, notorious for its usurpation of water hundreds of miles away to slake the thirst of its ever-expanding population. As a character in “Chinatown,” the noirish 1974 film starring Jack Nicholson that churns through the city’s water history, puts it, “Either you bring the water to L.A., or you bring L.A. to the water.”

Recently, however, Los Angeles has reduced its reliance on outside sources of water. It has become, of all things, a leader in sustainable water management, a pioneer in big-city use of cost-effective, environmentally beneficial water conservation, collection and reuse technologies. Some combination of these techniques is the most plausible path to survival for all the cities of the water-depleted West.