Freethought

Got My Plastic Jesus…

 

Photo by Joseph Novak. http://www.flickr.com/photos/josephleenovak/671972189/

 

Thanks to Bruce

I don’t care if it
Rains or freezes
As long as I’ve got my
Plastic Jesus
Ridin’ on the dashboard
Of my car

Through my trials
And tribulations
And my travels
Through the nation
With my plastic Jesus
I’ll go far

Ridin’ down the thoroughfare
With a nose up in the air
A wreck may be ahead
But he don’t mind

Trouble comin’
He don’t see
He just keeps his eye on me
And any other thing that lies behind

With my plastic Jesus
Goodbye and I’ll go far
I said with my plastic Jesus
Sitting on the dashboard of my car

When I’m in a traffic jam
He don’t care if I say damn
I can let all my curses roll

‘Cos Jesus’ plastic doesn’t hear
‘Cos he has a plastic ear
The man who invented plastic
Saved my soul

With my plastic Jesus
Goodbye and I’ll go far
I said with my plastic Jesus
Sitting on the dashboard of my car

An if I weave around at night
Policemen think I’m very tight
They never find my bottle
Though they ask

‘Cos plastic Jesus shelters me
For his head comes off you see
He’s hollow and I use him like a flask

Woa Woa Woa

Save me

I don’t care if it’s dark or scary
Long as I got magnetic Mary
Ridin’ on the dashboard of my car

I feel that I’m protected amply
I’ve got the love of the whole damn family
Ridin’ on the dashboard of my car

With my plastic Jesus
I said goodbye
And I’ll go far

And I said with my plastic Jesus
I said sittin’ on the dashboard of my car

When I’m goin’ fornicatin’
I’ve got my ceramic Satan
Sittin’ on the dashboard of my car
Women know I’m on the level
Thanks to the wide-eyed stoneware devil
Sneerin’ from the dashboard of my car

j2

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Why Blasphemy and Satire Cripples Organized Religion…

 

From Adi Chowdhury
Bangladeshi Humanist

“To appreciate satire, sometimes you need to lay a whole foundation of acceptance of criticism by others. And being at peace with being put on the spot and being responsible for your actions. Sadly, many of these elements are not present in that part of the world. And this is why satire could be viewed as an insult, or a direct attack.” –Basssem Youssef, Egyptian satirist

Organized religion has not shied away from voicing its vehement resentment of “blasphemy.” (Or, more aptly, organized religion has not shied away from ending the lives of those who commit “blasphemy”.) It is not altogether surprising to note this, in fact–authoritarian, oppressive forces have never exactly appreciated criticism against itself. Critics must be decimated, their mindsets lead them to believe. Blasphemy is treason. 

I’m fond of placing the word blasphemy in quotation marks (like “blasphemy”) since the act of “blaspheming” entails that the person has committed some kind of a crime. And what crime has he or she committed? Criticizing religion. I find that laughable. I find it laughable that simply criticizing religion deservedly earns you death threats, or death itself. I find it laughable that organized religion has mangled the concept of skepticism and curiosity to make it seem like a “sinful” act. I find it laughable that an all-powerful deity would ever be offended  or disgraced or even intimidated by a mere human criticizing His holy book. I find it laughable that a god, if he really is as wise as he professes himself to be, will prefer us to blindly submit to him and believe every claim he makes on just the basis of faith, rather than analytically evaluating the word of God and using the sense of logic that He claims to have given us. Established religion spurs us to appreciate and use the wonderful gifts and abilities granted by God…except for the sense of reason and skepticism. No, when it comes to God, always suppress logic. Never doubt. Always believe.

Bassem Youssef, an Egyptian satirist and television show host, is featured in the Big Think video above, expressing his understanding of why satire and criticism deals stunning blows to authoritative, oppressive governments and forces in power. Here’s a well-put excerpt from his eloquent and heartfelt speech:

“…Fear is an incredible mover of the masses. It brainwashes people. It makes people accept and even vote or something that’s against their own personal interests totally out of fear. And speaking about that particular point, it is the same reason why fascisms have a very poor sense of humor because when you have satire you’re not afraid anymore. They don’t want you thinking – they don’t want you to think and laugh, they want you to be in constant state of fear. If you’re laughing at them you’re basically laughing at their brainwashing techniques, at their use of fear and it’s not effective anymore, but if they don’t want that.”

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Bassem Youssef, award-winning satirist

Though Basssem Youssef in this video is elucidating his thoughts on fascist governmental systems rather than organized religion, chilling parallels between the two are hard to miss. Both the latter and the former have amassed notoriety due to their intolerance of dissenters. Both have suppressed the sense of skepticism and preached blind submission. Neither are known for hosting civil discussion and dialogue pertaining to its policies. Rather, the practice of suppressing doubt and promulgating the message of just believe has become synonymous with fascism—as well as the authoritarian nature of organized religion and evangelism.

Youssef, who himself was persecuted in his nation for his so-called “criticism of Islam” (although he himself is a Muslim) and satirical portrayal of the government, explains this issue far better than any writer on this blog can. Watch this enlightening video about why exactly fascist, oppressive forces are so intimidated by satire and “blasphemy.”
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Religion Is The Root Of All Ignorance…

 


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Sam Harris on Trump, Clinton, and Political Reality…

 

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Freethinkers: Robin Williams Born On This Day…

 

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From Freedom From Religion Foundation

Robin Williams

On this date in 1951, actor and comedian Robin McLaurin Williams was born in Chicago, Ill., to parents Laurie McLaurin, a model, and Robert Fitzgerald Williams, a Detroit auto executive. He grew up in Bloomfield, Mich., and Marin County, Calif., with brothers Robert Todd Williams and McLaurin Smith-Williams. Williams studied political science at Claremont McKenna College (then Claremont Men’s College), but left to study theatre at a community college before receiving a full scholarship to the Juilliard School in 1973. Scoring a guest-starring role on the sitcom “Happy Days” in 1978, Williams gained instant recognition for his role as the eccentric alien Mork. The reaction from fans earned him a show of his own based on the character in 1978. Following the success of “Mork and Mindy,” which aired for four seasons, Williams was catapulted into a long and illustrious career, beginning with major movie roles in “Popeye” (1980) and “The World According to Garp” (1982). At the same time, Williams achieved success for his standup specials: “Off the Wall” (1978), “An Evening with Robin Williams” (1982) and “Robin Williams: Live at the Met” (1986). Williams’ many films included a selection of critically-acclaimed dramatic roles such as “Good Morning, Vietnam” (1987) and “Dead Poets Society” (1989). He portrayed Oliver Sacks in the 1990 drama “Awakenings,” based on Sack’s moving memoir about briefly reviving catatonic patients. Williams captured Sacks’ mannerisms so perfectly that Sacks notes some people have actually accused him of imitating Robin Williams. Other films include “The Birdcage” (1996),“The Fisher King” (1991), “Hook” (1991), “Aladdin” (1992), “Mrs. Doubtfire” (1993), “Jumanji” (1995), “Good Will Hunting” (1997), “Flubber” (1997), “Insomnia” (2002), “Night at the Museum” (2006), “Happy Feet” (2006), “Night at the Museum: Battle of the Smithsonian” (2009), and “The Butler” (2013). Williams starred in the Off Broadway production of “Waiting for Godot” (1988) and in the Broadway show “Bengal Tiger at the Baghdad Zoo” (2011).

Miracle Workers: Preying on Sheep…

 

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From Internet Infidels

Anyone who has ever bumped into a theist has probably heard of the supposed miracles that come about through prayer, faith, and devotion to a particular deity. Miracles are important to the believer because they, in the theist’s mind, help to prove the reality of the supernatural. That is, if miracles can occur today then they certainly could have happened in the 1st century. Christopher Hitchens once proposed that he could grant Christians all of Jesus’ miracles and it still would not prove that Jesus was divine or that anything he said was true or moral[1] Still, this belief in the magical, as a method to justify faith in a deity which cannot be proved to exist, has and does persist in our culture. To be fair, not all Christians believe miracles happen today, but many, many still do.[2]

Miracle claims can come in a variety of forms. Before the advent of social media, when chain-emails were still a thing, one might have expected to be spammed with miracle stories about persecuted Christians driving otherwise inoperable cars after praying, Jesus saving people buried alive, or villainous atheist professors who drop chalk to prove God does not exist (because that’s a thing atheists do).[3] Beyond chain-email and Facebook spam stories lie the ever revered anecdotal accounts of miraculous occurrences in the everyday believer’s life[4] There is also the phenomena of miracle photographs, supposedly depicting angels or light from heaven.[5] Statues, too, can be miraculous when they allegedly weep or bleed.[6] There is even miracle food, such as the “Virgin Mary” grilled cheese which sold for $28K in an eBay auction in 2004.[7]

At A Child’s Grave…

 

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From ROBERT INGERSOLL (1833 – 1899)

Washington, D. C., January 8, 1882.

MY FRIENDS: I know how vain it is to gild a grief with words, and yet I wish to take from every grave its fear. Here in this world, where life and death are equal kings, all should be brave enough to meet what all the dead have met. The future has been filled with fear, stained and polluted by the heartless past. From the wondrous tree of life the buds and blossoms fall with ripened fruit, and in the common bed of earth, patriarchs and babes sleep side by side.

Why should we fear that which will come to all that is? We cannot tell, we do not know, which is the greater blessing—life or death. We cannot say that death is not a good. We do not know whether the grave is the end of this life, or the door of another, or whether the night here is not somewhere else a dawn. Neither can we tell which is the more fortunate—the child dying in its mother’s arms, before its lips have learned to form a word, or he who journeys all the length of life’s uneven road, painfully taking the last slow steps with staff and crutch.

Every cradle asks us “Whence?” and every coffin “Whither?” The poor barbarian, weeping above his dead, can answer these questions just as well as the robed priest of the most authentic creed. The tearful ignorance of the one, is as consoling as the learned and unmeaning words of the other. No man, standing where the horizon of a life has touched a grave, has any right to prophesy a future filled with pain and tears.

May be that death gives all there is of worth to life. If those we press and strain within our arms could never die, perhaps that love would wither from the earth. May be this common fate treads from out the paths between our hearts the weeds of selfishness and hate. And I had rather live and love where death is king, than have eternal life where love is not. Another life is nought, unless we know and love again the ones who love us here.

They who stand with breaking hearts around this little grave, need have no fear. The larger and the nobler faith in all that is, and is to be, tells us that death, even at its worst, is only perfect rest. We know that through the common wants of life—the needs and duties of each hour—their grief will lessen day by day, until at last this grave will be to them a place of rest and peace—almost of joy. There is for them this consolation: The dead do not suffer. If they live again, their lives will surely be as good as ours. We have no fear. We are all children of the same mother, and the same fate awaits us all. We, too, have our religion, and it is this: Help for the living—Hope for the dead.
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No Laughing In Heaven…

 

Thanks to Bruce

I used to be a sinner, used to have my cake and eat it
They warned me of my fate, but I was quite prepared to meet it
You’ll go to Hell they smiled at me
And told me of the roaring fires
But I was happy living wild
And fueling my own desires
I was a wild man
Drinking, smoking and messing around with women
Lots of women
No, not swimming, women

I wanna go to Heaven
The place to be is right up there
I wanna go to Heaven
It’s gonna be good so I won’t despair

Christian Crock: Hell, This Infinite Lie…

 

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From ROBERT INGERSOLL (1833 – 1899)

Is it necessary that Heaven should borrow its light from the glare of Hell?

Infinite punishment is infinite cruelty, endless injustice, immortal meanness. To worship an eternal gaoler hardens, debases, and pollutes even the vilest soul. While there is one sad and breaking heart in the universe, no good being can be perfectly happy.

Against the heartlessness of the Christian religion every grand and tender soul should enter solemn protest. The God of Hell should be held in loathing, contempt and scorn. A God who threatens eternal pain should be hated, not loved – cursed, not worshiped. A heaven presided over by such a God must be below the lowest hell. I want no part in any heaven in which the saved, the ransomed and redeemed will drown with shouts of joy the cries and sobs of hell – in which happiness will forget misery, where the tears of the lost only increase laughter and double bliss.

The idea of hell was born of ignorance, brutality, fear, cowardice, and revenge. This idea testifies that our remote ancestors were the lowest beasts. Only from dens, lairs, and caves, only from mouths filled with cruel fangs, only from hearts of fear and hatred, only from the conscience of hunger and lust, only from the lowest and most debased could come this cruel, heartless and bestial of all dogmas.

I would not for my life destroy one star of human hope, but I want it so that when a poor woman rocks the cradle and sings a lullaby to the dimpled darling, she will not be compelled to believe that ninety-nine chances in a hundred she is raising kindling wood for hell.

I would not for anything blot out the faintest star that shines in the horizon of human despair, nor in the sky of human hope; but I will do what I can to get that infinite shadow out of the heart of man…

Freethinkers: That Religion You’ve Been Given Is All Poison…

 

Thanks to Bruce

[My church believes heaven and hell are real places.]

[Mmm. Uh huh.]

[And uh, guess which one you are going to if you keep this up?]

[I don’t know how we can fix a world where people have been so convinced that they are doing the right thing out of compassion and love and trying to help people when it is absolute poison. When it is absolutely destructive.]

Now who’s the one that is responsible for how the world is?
Who’s the one that is responsible for how we all live?
Who takes the negative influences and poisons all the kids
So they just repeat the stupid shit that you and I did?

Who’s the species that wallows in this puddle of mud?
Who’s the one that painted the planet in buckets of blood?
Who’s the one that begs a god for forgiveness of sins,
Then turns right around the next day and does it again?

Julia Sweeney: Letting Go Of God…

 


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C’mon, C’mon, To My Atheist Funeral…


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Freethinker: John Davidson…

 

John Davidson, former host of the Tonight Show and Hollywood Squares, is Openly Secular! He started questioning religion early in college despite being a preacher’s son, and became secular as he did more reading and research. He struggled with being open during his time in show business, but wants to let everyone know he is still a moral, happy person without religion.

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The Atheist Hymn…

 

Thanks to Bruce

We pray to you, o nothing
To the cold and heartless void
And though you cannot answer
We never get annoyed
We worship Richard Dawkins and
The lovely Brian Cox
Who sport their heathen head-gear
And put on godless frocks

From “The God Delusion”
We divine our moral code
And from Mr Hitchens
A sacramental for the road
We reject your sky-god for
A sinful life, it’s true
We just want to blaspheme and
Have rampant bumming too

Every Sunday morning
Science opens all our eyes
We watch Carl Sagan’s “Cosmos” and
We bake fresh apple pies
Darwin’s theory is the
Sacred law by which we live
We denounce the profane
Creation hypothesis

Just one final thought we
Want to get in to your skull
This shit never happens ’cause
It’s not a faith at all
Atheism is the absence
Of belief in gods
It’s not a religion
Your argument’s a fraud …

… A-rseholes

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Freethinkers: Be sure to correct all the Hotel Bibles you encounter…

 

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From Always Question Authority
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There Is No God (And You Know It)…

 

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From Sam Harris

Somewhere in the world a man has abducted a little girl. Soon he will rape, torture, and kill her. If an atrocity of this kind not occurring at precisely this moment, it will happen in a few hours, or days at most. Such is the confidence we can draw from the statistical laws that govern the lives of six billion human beings. The same statistics also suggest that this girl’s parents believe — at this very moment — that an all-powerful and all-loving God is watching over them and their family. Are they right to believe this? Is it good that they believe this?

No.

The entirety of atheism is contained in this response. Atheism is not a philosophy; it is not even a view of the world; it is simply a refusal to deny the obvious. Unfortunately, we live in a world in which the obvious is overlooked as a matter of principle. The obvious must be observed and re-observed and argued for. This is a thankless job. It carries with it an aura of petulance and insensitivity. It is, moreover, a job that the atheist does not want.

The Agnostic Gospel Song…

 

Thanks to Bruce
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Freethinker: Born This Day — Pearl Buck

 

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From Freedom From Religion Foundation

On this day in 1892, Pearl S. Buck (nee Pearl Comfort Sydenstricker) was born in West Virginia to parents who were missionaries in China for the Southern Presbyterian church.

At three months, she moved with them to China, where she lived for the next 40 years, except to attend college. She was fourth of seven children, but only one of three to survive to adulthood. She attended a women’s college in Virginia for four years, and in 1917 married John Lossing Buck, an agricultural economist living in China. They lived in a rural province, which became the inspiration for The Good Earth, her 1931 bestseller, which won the Pulitzer. The couple had a baby in 1921 which was born with PKU, and was profoundly retarded. Pearl had a hysterectomy when a tumor was found during the delivery.

They adopted a child and taught at Nanking University. Pearl began writing for The Nation, Atlantic Monthly and other publications. Her first novel was East Wind, West Wind. She moved back to the United States permanently in 1934, settling in Green Hills Farm, Pennsylvania. Her publisher, Richard Walsh, became her second husband in 1935, and they adopted six children. Despite writing 70 books, Pearl found time to devote to civil rights and women’s rights. She was routinely published in the NAACP’s magazine, Crisis, and by the Urban League. She was a 20-year trustee of Howard University, and founded East and West Association, to improve relations between the United States and Asia. She also founded the first international, inter-racial adoption agency, Welcome House, in 1949, placing more than 5,000 children in homes. In 1964, she started the Pearl S. Buck Foundation to help Amerasian children. D. 1973.

“I feel no need for any other faith than my faith in human beings. Like Confucius of old, I am so absorbed in the wonder of earth and the life upon it that I cannot think of heaven and the angels.”

—Pearl Buck, “Advice to unborn novelists,” 1949, cited by George Seldes, The Great Quotations, & Pearl Buck, What America Means to Me, 1947

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Freethinker: Born on this Day — Atheist, Actor and Comedian Ricky Gervais…

 

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From Freedom from Religion Foundation

ON JUNE 25, 1961, Ricky Dene Gervais, was born. He makes TV shows and books and movies, but mostly he makes people laugh, and he makes them think, freely.

(He’s an Honorary Associate of the National Secular Society and decided as a child that he was an atheist.)

He grew up 40 miles west of London, England, in Reading, to working-class parents. He graduated from University College-London with a degree in philosophy and then worked in radio. What eventually brought him fame were his television series, The Office, which debuted in 2001, and Extras, in 2005.

He co-wrote and co-directed both with Stephen Merchant, his friend and frequent collaborator. Gervais also played the lead roles of David Brent in The Office and Andy Millman in Extras.

He’s received two Golden Globes for The Office (one for acting, one for the show itself), as well as numerous British Academy Television Awards and British Comedy Awards. He won a 2007 Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series for his role in Extras.

Gervais in a video interview with Richard Dawkins, explains how he became an atheist.  In it, he recounts an afternoon at home when he was about 8 years old. His mother was ironing and he was drawing Jesus on the cross as part of his Bible studies homework.

His brother, Bob, 11 years older than Ricky, asked him why he believed in God, a question which mortified their mother. Gervais remembers thinking, “Why was that a bad thing to ask? If there was a god and my faith was strong, it didn’t matter what people thought. Oh …  hang on. There is no God. He knows it, and she knows it deep down. It was as simple as that. I started thinking about it and asking more questions, and within an hour I was an atheist.”

In 2009, in a TV interview, Gervais said: “It’s always better to tell the truth. The truth doesn’t hurt, and saying that, my mother only ever lied to me about one thing. She said there was a God. But that’s because when you’re a working-class mum, Jesus is like an unpaid babysitter. She thought if I was God-fearing, then I’d be good.”
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The End: What Science and Religion Tell Us About the Apocalypse…

 

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From IEET

Book Review

When false beliefs influence us, they also can harm us…

Phil Torres’ new book The End: What Science and Religion Tell Us about the Apocalypse, is one of the most important books recently published. It offers a fascinating study of the many real threats to our existence, provides multiple insights as to how we might avoid extinction, and it is carefully and conscientiously crafted.

The basic theme is that powerful new technologies threaten the survival of the entire human species. Moreover, belief in religious eschatologies, or end-times narratives, greatly exacerbate the problem. These superstitious, faith-based beliefs greatly increase the probability that our species will either annihilate itself, or fail to anticipate various existential threats because, as technology becomes more powerful, the ability of religious fanatics to realize some of their apocalyptic visions increases. Our predicament then is that “neoteric technologies and archaic belief systems are colliding with potentially catastrophic consequences.”

Now religious believers have been crying that the “end is near” for a long time. Most biblical scholars see Jesus as a failed apocalyptic prophet, and throughout history many Christians have forecast that the end of the world was imminent. Eschatological beliefs play a large role in Islam as well, and many Muslims believe that Madhi will descend from heaven along with Jesus to usher in the end of the world. While such beliefs are silly, they are not irrelevant. When false beliefs influence us, they also can harm us.

Such considerations lead Torres to differentiate between religious and secular eschatology. Faith and revelation provide the epistemological foundation for supernatural eschatology, while reason, observation and evidence underlie the epistemological foundation of worries about natural threats. It follows then that rational persons should take the latter threats seriously, but not the former. We should worry that asteroids, pathogens, nuclear war, artificial intelligence and the like may destroy, but not worry that Jesus or Allah will. But again believers in religious eschatologies are dangerous, especially if they utilize advanced technologies to usher in their view of the apocalypse.

Christian Crock: Evangelicals adore Trump because he’s so much like their Biblical God…

 

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Why So Many Evangelicals Find Donald Trump Simply Irresistible

People have been scratching their heads about how so many “family values” American voters who claim to love Jesus can follow Donald Trump. What ever happened to love thy neighbor, and if you have two coats give one to the poor, and turn the other cheek, and feed my lambs, and the meek shall inherit the Earth?  Some horrified Christian leaders have gone so far as to say a person can’t be a Christian and a Trump supporter.

Of course times are hard and, in fairness, fear and downward mobility do weird things to people, including Christians. And some folks, whether Christian or not, are congenitally horrid. But shouldn’t Bible belief inoculate earnest believers against someone who seems like the polar opposite of Jesus?

Perhaps the problem is that Trump is a lot like a different Bible character—one who also is the polar opposite of Jesus in many ways, but who young believers are nevertheless taught to worship and praise. I’m talking about the character of Jehovah; Yahweh as some people call him; The Great I Am; the LORD God of the Old Testament who makes it into the New Testament as both the father of Jesus and his alter-ego, and later into the Quran.

One way that biblical literalism screws with people’s heads is this: Children are taught from a young age that God is perfect—the essence of Love and Truth. But when you look a little closer at the stories in the Bible, it turns out that he’s an awful lot like Trump.

Arabic Translation of “The God Delusion” Downloaded 10 Million Times…

 

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From Atheist Republic

Richard Dawkins’ bestselling nonfiction book “The God Delusion” has not only been translated into Arabic by Iraqi translator Bassam Al-Baghdadi, but its pdf version has also been downloaded 10 million times, with at least 30 percent of all downloads being made in Saudi Arabia. According to Al-Baghdadi, a resident of Sweden, more than 1,000 downloads took place on the first day itself, immediately after he had uploaded the pdf version of the text, thus making it available for readers online. Apparently, the numbers kept climbing as the translation continued to be shared on websites, forums and blogs of prominent Arab atheists.

In his translation of “The God Delusion”, Al-Baghdadi added the phrase “This book is banned in Islamic countries” right below the title. Naturally, his move prompted unprecedented debate in both Saudi Arabia as well as other Muslim countries. After being accused of conspiring with Zionists to corrupt the youth, Al-Baghdadi started to receive death threats.1 That is when he decided to close all of his social media accounts and discontinue posting online for a while.

Richard Dawkins Short Interview July 19, 2016…

 


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The Freethinker and The Improved Man…

 

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From ROBERT INGERSOLL (1833 – 1899)

As long as men believe in tyranny in heaven they will practice tyranny on earth….

The object of the Freethinker is to ascertain the truth—the conditions of well-being—to the end that this life will be made of value. This is the affirmative, positive, and constructive side.

Without liberty there is no such thing as real happiness. There may be the contentment of the slave—of one who is glad that he has passed the day without a beating—one who is happy because he has had enough to eat—but the highest possible idea of happiness is freedom.

All religious systems enslave the mind. Certain things are demanded—certain things must be believed—certain things must be done—and the man who becomes the subject or servant of this superstition must give up all idea of individuality or hope of intellectual growth and progress.

The religionist informs us that there is somewhere in the universe an orthodox God, who is endeavoring to govern the world, and who for this purpose resorts to famine and flood, to earthquake and pestilence—and who, as a last resort, gets up a revival of religion. That is called “affirmative and positive.”

The man of sense knows that no such God exists, and thereupon he affirms that the orthodox doctrine is infinitely absurd. This is called a “negation.” But to my mind it is an affirmation, and is a part of the positive side of Freethought.

My Church…

 

Thanks to Bruce

I’ve cursed on a Sunday
I’ve cheated and I’ve lied
I’ve fallen down from grace
A few too many times
But I find holy redemption
When I put this car in drive
Roll the windows down and turn up the dial

[Chorus]
Can I get a hallelujah
Can I get an amen
Feels like the Holy Ghost running through ya
When I play the highway FM
I find my soul revival
Singing every single verse
Yeah I guess that’s my church

When Hank reads the sermon
And Cash leads the choir
It gets my cold cold heart burning
Hotter than a ring of fire
When this wonderful world gets heavy
And I need to find my escape
I just keep the wheels rolling, radio scrolling
Until my sins wash away

[Chorus]

[Chorus]

[Chorus]

Can I get a hallelujah
Can I get an amen
Feels like the Holy Ghost running through ya
When I play the highway FM
I find my soul revival
Singing every single verse
Yeah I guess that’s my church
Yeah I guess that’s my church
Yeah I guess that’s my church
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Atheist Group Will Offer Free Secular Memorial Services for Families of Orlando Nightclub Victims…

 

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From Hemant Mehta

Members of the Central Florida Freethought Community have spent the past couple of days trying to figure out what they could do to help people affected by the recent mass shooting at Pulse nightclub. They knew they could make donations and give blood, but was there anything different they could bring to the table to help people?

Yes there was. While we’re all aware that the shooter was Muslim, we haven’t heard much about the religious beliefs of the 49 victims. Given that they were obviously LGBT individuals or allies, there’s reason to believe many of them were non-religious.

And that’s why CFFC will be offering free secular memorial services for their families: