Gina Covina: First Harvest for Laytonville Seed Growers Co-op


seedcoop

From GINA COVINA
Laughing Frog Farm
Laytonville

Here’s a visual report on the first seed-sharing gathering of the Mendocino Seed Growers Co-op – at this point more accurately called the Laytonville Seed Growers Co-op, as that’s who came to yesterday’s event at the Laytonville Grange. It looked like a small group of gardeners – a baker’s dozen in all – until we got out our seeds. An altogether awesome collection, many with amazing stories and long local histories. By the end of the evening I was overwhelmed by the abundance of valuable genetic material, the breadth and depth of information exchanged, and the commitment to the future of food shown by beginning seed-savers and old-timers alike.

Above are some of the contributions, clockwise starting at the top: Crane melon, Bale bean, Orca bean, San Marzano tomato, hull-less pumpkin, Sweet Meat squash, Principe Borghese tomato, red mustard, Trombetta squash, Cannellini bean, Shintokiwa cucumber, Mache (aka corn salad). And in the center a flour corn that has been grown and saved in these hills over a decade.

Some of the seeds will show up next at the Laytonville Garden Club’s seed and scion exchange, February 16 at 11am. A few varieties will be available this spring through Laughing Frog Farm seeds. For the rest – well, you had to be there. Increasing the amounts of seed available will be one of our goals as we grow.
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One Comment

As a nearly totally ignorant gardener, I have tried saving seeds from my garden and all I get are unsatisfactory fruits as a result of cross fertilization. My impression is that growing seed is a very different process than growing produce. When one uses seeds from exchanges how much do we need to be concerned about cross fertilization?

y

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