Organic Garlic Mashed Potatoes With Cheese (Aligot) and Psychedelic Mashed Potatoes Recipes


From GREG ATKINSON
OrganicToBe.org

Purple or “blue” potatoes are smooth textured and excellent for mashing. Peel the potatoes and cut them into uniform small dice, so that they cook rapidly and evenly. Use just enough water to barely cover the potatoes, and when you drain them, just before mashing, save the cooking liquid and pour some back into the mash to make a smoother purée. The outrageous color is especially effective with dark or red meats and brilliant green vegetables. It’s nice to know that anthocyanins, the pigments that make some vegetables purple, are healthy antioxidants. Use this same technique to make mashed parsnips.

Makes about 6 cups, serving 6

3 pounds organic purple potatoes
1 tablespoon kosher salt
About 6 cups water
6 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into ½-inch bits

1. Peel the potatoes and cut them into 1-inch cubes. Put the cubed potatoes and salt in a heavy, 1-gallon stockpot and cover them with the water. Cook the potatoes until they are fork-tender and just beginning to fall apart, about 15 minutes.

2. Drain the potatoes through a colander over a bowl or another pot to save the cooking liquid. Force the cooked potatoes through a ricer, or, if no ricer available, put the drained potatoes back in the pot in which they were cooked and mash them with a potato masher or a whisk. Whisk in the butter and just enough of the reserved cooking liquid to render the mashed potatoes smooth and creamy.

3. Covered and placed over the lowest possible heat, the potatoes can be held for up to 20 minutes before serving. If they are going to be held for more than a few minutes, make a ring of aluminum foil and put it between the burner and the pot of potatoes to keep them from burning on the bottom. Serve the mashed potatoes hot.
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Aligot or Garlic Mashed Potatoes With Cheese

I discovered this dish when I was in Ardèche, a region of France just west of Lyon in the high hills that occupy the heart of the country. I made it first with potatoes I bought at the farmer’s market in a tiny village called St. Bonnet le Froid, on a small burner in my hotel room. If Cantal cheese is not available, try fontina or, in a pinch, a simple Monterey Jack. Stirring the mash as the cheese melts makes it super-elastic and stringy. The texture is as much fun as the flavor. This dish is so rich that it is practically a meal in itself. Leftover aligot can be cut, pressed into patties, coated in breadcrumbs, and warmed in butter.

Makes about 4 cups, serving 4

2 pounds organic Yukon Gold potatoes
1 tablespoon kosher salt
About 6 cups water
12 cloves garlic, peeled
8 ounces imported Cantal cheese, grated

1. Scrub the potatoes thoroughly and cut them into 1-inch cubes. Put the cubed potatoes and salt in a heavy, 4-quart stockpot and cover them with water. Cook the potatoes until they are quite tender and beginning to fall apart, about 15 minutes.

2. Meanwhile, in a separate pot, cook the garlic over medium-high heat with just enough water to cover. As soon as the garlic is tender, transfer it with its cooking liquid to a blender and purée until very smooth.

3. Drain the potatoes through a colander. Put the drained potatoes back in the stockpot and whisk in the garlic purée, mashing the potatoes in the process. Keep whipping until the mashed potatoes are smooth and creamy.

4. Stir in the grated cheese and continue stirring until the melted cheese forms long strands that stretch away from the spoon as you stir. Serve hot.


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