9 things I learned by shadowing a home-energy inspector


From GRIST

[…] It helps to learn firsthand. The most interesting part of the four-hour visit was the blower-door test. Paul used a large fan with an airtight skirt to blow air out the front door, depressurizing the house and accelerating small air leaks so they’re easier to find. Cold air coming up from the basement doorway felt like a minor squall. Even tiny leaks passing through light-switch plates were perceptible. Langdon followed Paul around and felt each leak for himself — which make it easier to understand the problem.

Thermal imaging cameras are nifty. They make it visual and perceptible where heat escapes — both through air leaks through solid surfaces. Langdon will get a series of photos that Paul shot.

Attics should get insulation first, then walls and basements. Because heat rises. Windows are so expensive they’re rarely worth replacing for heating-bill savings alone…

Utilities are driving the retrofit industry right now… Utilities aren’t paying for reviews and retrofits because they’re tree huggers. They’re doing it because cutting demand is cheaper than building new power plants. All together now: Efficiency is the cheapest form of energy

Full article here
~~

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 4,559 other followers