Here’s The Beef (With Organic Grass-Fed Steak And Hamburger Recipes)



From GREG ATKINSON
OrganicToBe

Not long ago, I spent a day at a ranch in Central Texas where my father grew up. One of his childhood friends was showing us around his section of grazing land. Bluebonnets and Indian paintbrush were blooming, and along the horizon, a small herd of cattle stood in silhouette against the clear blue sky punctuated with puffy white clouds.

“I’m leasing the land now to a fellow who’s raising grass fed beef,” explained my father’s friend. “He wants to keep it all natural.” As we walked, my Old Man and his friend shared memories of their childhoods during the Great Depression when their parents worked at the nearby cotton gin.

“Do you remember the burgers?” my father’s friend wanted to know. “I used to ride my bike from the cotton gin into town to buy hamburgers for the crew. They charged a nickel apiece, but if I could get five other guys to order one, the burger joint would give me six burgers for a quarter and I could keep one for myself. Those hamburgers were the best-tasting things in the world.” My father agreed; nothing like ‘em. “Beef just tasted better then.”

How Now Brown Cow?


From ELLEN JACKSON
Culinate.com

How and why to buy your beef direct from the ranch

Worried about E. coli in your hamburgers? Skeptical that “natural” beef isn’t as natural as it sounds at the supermarket? Trying to stretch the annual food budget?

Consider skipping the middleman and buying your beef directly from the farmer. You get to meet the person who raised the animal and ask questions about what it was fed, how it was treated, and even how it was slaughtered. And in most cases, you get to order exactly the cuts of meat you want. Bonus: Per pound, this premium meat is cheaper than most meat in the supermarket.

Here are eight reasons to buy your own side (a half-cow, for the technically minded) of grass-fed beef. As we head into spring, meat CSAs are signing up customers; now’s the time to investigate farm-direct purchasing of meat.

Egg In The Eye (Organic Recipe)



From JESSE COOL
Organic To Be

Both of my kids, who are grown and cooking for themselves now, never tired of this dish. In truth, the best part was always the little piece of toast that came from the cutout circle in the middle of the bread, where the yolk peeks through. Jonah, my youngest, was very happy when I buttered an extra slice of bread, cut it into little pieces, and toasted it, so he could have more crispy toast for dipping in the yolk. This recipe calls for only 1 egg per person. You can cut a larger hole in each bread slice and cook 2 eggs inside.

6 bread slices (white, wheat, Italian, sourdough, potato, English muffins)
4 tablespoons unsalted butter at room temperature
4 organic, free-range eggs
Salt and freshly ground pepper

E. F. Schumacher Rides Again


E. F. (Fritz) Schumacher

From JOHN MICHAEL GREER
The Archdruid Report

Last week’s Archdruid Report post [Becoming a Third World Country] fielded a thoughtful response from peak oil blogger Sharon Astyk, who pointed out that what I was describing as America’s descent to Third World status could as well be called a future of “ordinary human poverty.” She’s quite right, of course. There’s nothing all that remarkable about the future ahead of us; it’s simply that the unparalleled abundance that our civilization bought by burning through half a billion years of stored sunlight in three short centuries has left most people in the industrial world clueless about the basic realities of human life in more ordinary times.

It’s this cluelessness that underlies so many enthusiastic discussions of a green future full of high technology and relative material abundance. Those discussions also rely on one of the dogmas of the modern religion of progress, the article of faith that the accumulation of technical knowledge was what gave the industrial world its three centuries of unparalleled wealth; since technical knowledge is still accumulating, the belief goes, we may expect more of the same in the future.

See rest of article Why Factories Aren’t Efficient here
~
See also SmallIsBeautiful.org
~~

A Simpler Way



From TED TRAINER
Panania, Australia

1. THE GLOBAL SITUATION

Global problems are rapidly getting worse.  The environment is being severely damaged.  Resources are being depleted.   The poorest billion are probably becoming poorer.  Even in the richest societies the quality of life is falling, cohesion is eroding and social problems are accelerating.

These problems cannot be solved without huge and fundamental change, because they are directly caused by our present socio-economic system.

The basic faults built into our society centre firstly on the demand for high material “living standards” in a world of limited resources. We cannot keep up the present levels of production and consumption and resource use for long, and there is no possibility of all the world’s people ever rising to these levels. People in rich countries have these high “living standards” only because we are taking much more than our fair share of the available resources and depriving the majority.

Salmon vs. Small Farmers?



From MICHAEL LAYBOURN
Hopland

This is a response to the piece on Senator Feinstein’s amendment to the jobs bill (Feinstein Declares War On Salmon and Fishing Jobs).

I’m no fan of Feinstein, who not only stuffs her and hubby Richard Blum’s pockets with millions of taxpayer dollars and whose response to letters is always the same: “Thank you for your letter concerning impeachment proceedings against President George W. Bush. I appreciate the time you took to write and welcome the opportunity to respond….” , but we really know more than you about this…

My understanding of this amendment is that she proposes to increase farm water allocations from 10 percent last year to 40 percent this year and next, an amount that farmers say is the bare minimum they need.

I have been studying the water situation for some time and found that it is a highly complex situation. I certainly don’t have all the answers, but here are some other things to think about…

Pathways to Re-Localisation with Joel Salatin (Video)


Video After The Jump Below

From OWEN HABLUTZEL
HopeDance via Energy Bulletin

… Not merely a “lunatic farmer,” Joel Salatin is also a prolific author, front-line local-food activist, regenerative-silvo-pastoral-profitable-Permaculture farmer, sought-after speaker, marketing guru, agricultural innovator, eco-prophet, and general “bio-evangelist.” He has been written about quite extensively elsewhere, has appeared in worthy films such as Food, Inc. and Fresh, and well-deservedly ranks as something of a celebrity-dynamo in the eco-ag domain.

In 1961 his father moved the family to an abused, soil-depleted, de-vegetated, gully-infested, 550 acre block of land in Virginia called Polyface Farm. Beginning then, and continuing to this day, the Salatin family began a series of adaptive experiments in natural farming that regenerated Polyface and, to a large degree, aspects of the surrounding communities.

Healthy Food, Local Food


From JOHN IKERD
Professor Emeritus, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO – USA

Local foods have replaced organic foods as the most dynamic sector of the retail food market. Sales of local foods grew from $4 billion in 2002 to $5 billion in 2007 and are projected to reach $11 billion by 2011.[i] Organic food sales are still far larger, more than $20 billion, but the rate of growth in organic food sales seems to be slowing while local food sales are accelerating.  For many people, local has become more important than organic. In fact, the word “locavore” was chosen by the New Oxford American Dictionary as their 2007 “word of the year.” The term was first associated with the “100-mile diet,” but is described more generally as someone who shows a strong preference for foods that are locally grown, seasonally available, and produced without unnecessary additives or preservatives.[ii]

The local foods movement represents the latest phase in the decades-old evolution toward a new sustainable food system.

Goats, Chicken Yurts, and Olive Trees


From PEAK MOMENT TELEVISION

Tour the century-old organic Chaffin Family Orchards where even the animals are “farm hands.”

Visit chickens in their egg-mobile, scratching for bugs and pooping fertilizer in the heirloom stone-fruit orchards.

Goats chomp off low branches from the olive trees, so no fuel or human labor is needed.

This certified predator-friendly enterprise includes 200 acres of olive trees plus various fruit and nut trees; sheep, goats, broiler and egg-laying chickens.

They distribute only locally through fruit and meat CSAs (community-supported agriculture), growers markets and a farmstand, providing fresh foods that burst with flavor and nuance.
~~

Take Action! Feinstein Declares War on Salmon and Fishing Jobs



From PLANNING AND CONSERVATION LEAGUE
Thanks to Rosalind Peterson, Redwood Valley

Call Senator Dianne Feinstein today to stop her from dismantling the Endangered Species Act’s (ESA) basic protections for California’s endangered chinook (also known as king) salmon.

The Pacific Fisheries Management Council has just released numbers showing California’s once abundant salmon runs came in at a new all time record low in 2009.

As a result, regulators closed all ocean fishing of chinook salmon in California and most of Oregon in 2008 and 2009 to save the salmon.

Senator Feinstein is proposing an amendment to a federal jobs stimulus bill that, in effect, would suspend rules that protect salmon from being killed by the giant diversion pumps in the San Francisco-San Joaquin Delta and would pump more water from the estuary.

Feinstein claims that this amendment will bring jobs to California.  But, the closure of the western salmon fisheries has cost 23,000 jobs and $1.4 billion in the California economy.

Why Aren’t Americans Scared of GMOs?



From TREEHUGGER

After reports last week that India halted plans to introduce a genetically modified eggplant to the market because of an outcry from environmental groups and the general public, it begs to question why in the US genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are so common. In fact, more than 9 out of 10 soybean seeds are not only genetically modified, but come from Monsanto. It’s just a little lower for corn. It makes you wonder why Americans aren’t a little more skeptical, if not completely frightened of the fate of our food system.

Last week the Times of India reported that Jairam Ramesh, the country’s environment minister, said there is no clear consensus among scientists on the safety of a genetically modified eggplant and, therefore, halted its release. And Europe is just as skeptical. The European Parliament adopted the world’s strictest and most comprehensive rules on the labeling of GMOs. Egypt also has strict rules on GMOs. Collin wrote extensively about GMOS around the world. But here in the US, the picture is a little different. The Senate Foreign Relations Committee unanimously approved a bill which specifies that the US must fund GMOs and biotechnology. Even without this additional push in the wrong direction, we have already ventured a long way down a GMO road.

A Round-up of What’s Happening out in the World of Transition


From ROB HOPKINS
Transition Culture

We haven’t done one of these for a while, so here, thanks to the marvel that is Google Alerts, is a taste of some of things underway out there in Transition-land.  For more regular and formal updates you can subscribe to Transition Network News, but these irregular digests offer a more informal and random insight into what you are up to.  Congratulations to Transition Horncastle for being selected to compete in the British Gas Green Streets project, which could win them £100,000 to spend on a local environmental project if they are the best at achieving the Green Streets project’s objectives. And well done TT West Kirby for being awarded funds for their Youth Inclusion Project. Congratulations also to TT Kingston for their Green Guardian award and TN’s Shaun Chamberlin’s Green Champion award, both sponsored by the Kingston Guardian newspaper and the local council.

In the US, towns are rushing to make the Transition to low-carbon communities including TT Berea, which has started a community campaign of ‘50×25’ to reduce its energy use by 50%, and also get 50% of its food and energy from local sources, all by 2025…and Transition Reno kicks off with action on awareness raising. Also in the US, there’s a Transition Farm (not official) in North Carolina… and TT Charlotte together with the Energy Committees of Charlotte and Shelbourne are working with Efficiency Vermont to bring a new energy-saving program to local residents. And from Canada, we have a little movie all about some of the wonderful activities that Transition groups in Calgary are up to.

A Citizens Panel to Restructure County Government NOW


From JIM HOULE
Redwood Valley

To My Fellow Concerned Citizens:

Now is a the perfect opportunity to seize the initiative.  The CEO system has failed us. The CEO arrangement tends to accumulate too much power in too few hands, leaving the Board of Supervisors disconnected from the mechanics of day to day governance. The costs of the CEO system are exorbitant when the past two CEOs, Ball and Mitchell immediately added additional staff at high salaries. They placed another layer of administration between Department heads and policy makers on the Board of Supervisors and made it more difficult for the Supervisors to determine what were the problems, where were departments under-performing, and finding out from the workers themselves how they felt changes, reforms and economies could best be made.

If the past is any guide to future performance, the BOS is likely to futz around for months before they recruit another CEO or decide to revert to the CAO structure that served the county for a much longer period. We recommend that a Citizens Panel be set up, independent of the Board of Supervisors, and selected by the citizens themselves to study all aspects of the question, hold public meetings to discuss their ideas and receive input, and prepare a report.within a few months recommending changes to the structure, if they determine they are necessary, and  suggesting a procedure  for finding a new  Chief of Government, whether CEO or CAO.

Grass-fed lamb — Which foods are you willing to pay top dollar for?


From KELLY MYERS
Culinate.com

All the recent articles filled with tips on slashing your grocery bill are making me uneasy.

I am not opposed to most of the advice. In fact, I agree with it. Yes, we should shop mindfully, cook from scratch, and eschew convenience foods. This is true whether the economy is flush or tanking.

Let’s get reacquainted with these practical habits; let’s become better cooks.

What bothers me, though, is a certain tone. Underlying the lists of helpful hints, I detect a set of beliefs about food’s relative importance. Or unimportance.

One: We are like broken records, forever thinking that food ought to cost less. Are farmers’ markets really to be regarded as an occasional indulgence — as I have seen them characterized — when the fruits and vegetables for sale there are among the most nutrient-dense and healthful foods to be found?

Two: When the cost of living goes up, one of the first places we look to cut corners is on what we eat, to compromise on what we put into our bodies.

When we scale back, I fear that instead of practicing the peasant’s art of turning humble fare into a nice spread, we merely substitute poor-quality ingredients. This is a half-baked effort to eat the way we always have, but for less money… More at Culinate
~~

A Mendo Meat Processing Plant?


From MICHAEL LAYBOURN
Hopland

After reading Michael Pollan’s books and researching the state of the meat industry (which is controlled by big ag corporations), I find I don’t like commercially processed meats. I was curious how best to eat free range chickens, eggs, grass fed cattle and bison and locally raised pork. In addition, I am interested in pushing for a strong local economy.

The first thought is food and how to support the farmers and ranchers locally. This is necessary if we want to build a true local economy. So I’ve been talking a lot to local cattle raisers, pig and chicken ranchers, the bison people out highway 20 and finding out this: That it is nearly impossible to find humanely raised and processed meat that has been processed locally, unless it has been done by a mobile butcher setup.

The food part of a local economy, to be strong, has to serve all the people locally, so any business that can help the ranchers and farmers raise food and provide jobs with an environmentally sound approach should be welcome.

It stands to reason that if we had a local meat processing plant in Mendocino county, then thousands of miles driven in trucks could be eliminated.

Globalization Is Killing the Globe: Return to Local Economies



From THOM HARTMANN
ThomHartmann.com

Globalization is killing Europe, just as it’s already wiped out much of the American middle class.

Spain and Greece are facing immediate crises that many other European nations see on the near horizon: aging boomer workers are retiring with healthy benefit packages, but the younger workers who are paying for those benefits aren’t making anything close to the income (or, therefore, paying the taxes) that their parents did.

Globalists/corporatists/conservative “free market” and “flat earth” advocates say this is a great opportunity to cut benefits for the old folks (and for the young folks in the future), thus bringing the countries budgets back into balance, and this story is the main corporate media storyline.

But it overlooks the real issue (and the real solution): how globalization is killing these nations’ economies and what can be done about it.

From the days of Adam Smith, classical economics pointed out that manufacturing and extraction are the only two ways to “create wealth.”

“Wealth” is different from “income.” Wealth is value, which endures at least for some time. Income is simply compensation for work. If you wash my car for $10 and I mow your lawn for $10, we have a GDP of $20 and it looks like we both have income and economic activity. But no wealth has been created, just income.

Take Action! Comments to USDA on Genetically Modified Alfalfa


From WESTERN ORGANIZATION OF RESOURCE COUNCILS

Just a few days left to comment on the release of genetically modified (GM) alfalfa. The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) preliminary decision is to allow GM alfalfa without any limitations or protections for farmers, consumers or the environment.

According to USDA, there is no evidence that consumers care about GM alfalfa. And, the agency dismisses the threat of GM contamination to farmers’ domestic and export markets and organic dairy and meat products.

Go to USDA’s website and tell USDA that it should not approve the release of GM alfalfa.

Take Action! Mendocino County: Demand Community Input On New Leadership! (Updated)



From DAVE SMITH
Ukiah

Let’s abolish the title and function of CEO. It should be Chief Administrative Officer (CAO) who is a servant of the citizens and reports to our elected Supervisors. Of course, the title means nothing if the CAO acts like a CEO, as has been the history in this county whatever the title.

We must also have a responsive CAO who will work with our local expertise in moving to alternative energy systems rather than spending millions on consultants from elsewhere.

[Update: And while we are at it, change Supervisor meetings to evenings at citizen’s convenience, instead of Supervisor’s convenience!]

How do we make this happen?

Your thoughts?
~~

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